Disrupting Healthcare – The UX Boot Camp: Emessence

Exploring ways to support patients with the neurodegenerative disease Multiple Sclerosis.

Imagine being diagnosed with a volatile disease that gets worse the longer it goes untreated. Now imagine a doctor telling you that the available drug therapy is only effective 40% of the time, and they won’t know if it’s actually working because symptoms are so unpredictable.

This is the reality for patients with Multiple Sclerosis (MS). We can do better.

For the November UX Boot Camp, we are partnering with Emessence, a healthcare startup that strives to help patients with MS to take back control. In four intense days, you’ll craft mobile design solutions that help MS patients manage their medical treatments and lifestyle in order to slow the disease progression and improve their quality of life.

Ready for the challenge? Come join us this November 18-21 for the UX Boot Camp: Emessence in San Francisco.

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Service Design 101

This article was co-written by Lauren Chapman Ruiz and Izac Ross

We all hear the words “service design” bandied about, but what exactly does it mean? Clients and designers often struggle to find a common language to define the art of coordinating services, and frequent questions arise. Often it emerges as necessary in the space of customer experience or complicated journey maps. In response, here is a brief FAQ primer to show the lay of the land in service design.

What are services?

Services are intangible economic goods—they lead to outcomes as opposed to physical things customers own. Outcomes are generated by value exchanges that occur through mediums called touchpoints. For example, when you use Zipcar, you don’t actually own the Zipcar, you buy temporary ownership. You use the car, then transfer it to someone else once it is returned. Every point in which you engage with Zipcar is a touchpoint.

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Leading By Design

In my career, I’ve spent a lot of time learning from great design leaders. The best stand out as creative, thoughtful listeners, able to persuade with grace and speak hard truths, while uniting the team around a focused vision.

Through my involvement in Cooper U’s Design Leadership course, I’ve learned techniques to repeat the success of these leaders. Recently, I had the privilege of co-teaching with two of Cooper’s design leaders, Jenea Hayes and course creator Kendra Shimmell. In the class, these bright ladies presented tools that help the rest of us become leaders who can sell a vision, unite a team, and achieve organizational consent. The following overview captures a small slice of the course content from general principles to practical applications that are simple yet powerfully effective ideas for all of us.

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Designs That Change Lives: UX Boot Camp and Kiva

“The UX Boot Camp is a transformational experience, disguised as a training.”

- Lead UX Boot CampTeacher, Stefan Klocek

In each UX Boot Camp, participants dive headfirst into design. They are challenged by a real-world problem and in just four days produce clever design solutions tailored to their clients needs.

At the UX Boot Camp with Kiva, the designers’ mission was to envision web concepts that helped Kiva lenders decide which loans are best for them and facilitate the loan selection process. Currently, lenders can feel overwhelmed or discouraged by the number of borrowers and different types of loans. So Kiva was looking for ways to empower lenders and help them make decisions with their money.

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Cooper U On The Road

Are your products failing to resonate with users? Too many features creating bloat? Many of today’s products are driven by spreadsheets, technology constraints, and feature lists. They leave frustrated customers wanting more.

We believe a better approach to design focuses on the human needs first and technology second.

In Cooper’s Interaction Design training, we can help you envision, plan, and build products and services that are financially viable, technically feasible, and that your customers will love.

Beginning this December, Cooper is bringing our experience-based, hands-on training to sites around the world.

Where will we be going?

December 3-6 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

May 2014 in Berlin, Germany (If you want to be the first to know when we announce the dates, add you name here)

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Designing the Future: Cooper in Berlin

Most software projects are built around the question “What are we going to do next?” But occasionally we’re asked to think farther out. Projects focused on the 5-10 year range are more about “Where are we headed?” and “What’s going to inspire people?” These are different questions to ask, and answering them changes the usual process of interaction design.

I’ve been thinking about these things for a while, and while at the MobX conference in Berlin I conducted a workshop where a group of 16 designers and strategists took a look at how you answer these questions.

So…how do you do it? The core of the matter is to understand what’s going to be different in the future you’re designing for.

These kinds of projects are less about “What’s next?” and more about “Where are we headed?” and “What’s going to inspire people?”

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Inside the IxDA 2014 Student Design Challenge

Photo by Jeremy Yuille

As co-chair of the 2014 IxDA Student Design Challenge with Dianna Miller, I recently had the pleasure of announcing this year’s theme, “Information for Life,”sponsored by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

Now in its fifth year, the IxDA Student Design Challenge (SDC) will run during the Interaction14 conference in Amsterdam, February 5-8, 2014. The competition brings together exceptional undergraduate and graduate students for both critical thinking and hands-on experiences over the course of the conference. Here, students have the opportunity to present their work in a way that shows, rather than tells, and it’s also a terrific venue for students to connect with colleagues, potential employers, funders, or new networks.

And I speak from experience — this competition holds a special place in my heart as I was a participant myself just a few years ago, in 2011.

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Engaging Millennials – the UX Boot Camp: Wikipedia

As mobile devices become widely adopted, organizations are increasingly focused on designing engaging experiences across multiple platforms. At Cooper’s UX Boot Camp with Wikimedia, the non-profit took this a step further, challenging the class of designers to create a solution that facilitated content input and encouraged a new group of editors, specifically Millennial women, to contribute through mobile devices.

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Road Trip: Cooper U’s Interaction Design Training Heads East!

In service of spreading design awareness and education, Cooper U is bringing its foundational training in Interaction Design to Philadelphia on December 3-6 to cap off a great 2013. Throughout the year we’ve received many requests from our design peers to bring our training east, so when we had the opportunity to add another class to the schedule, we thought Philadelphia would be the perfect location.

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UX Boot Camp with Marketplace Money

Old School Radio Meets the Digital Age

Take a look inside Cooper’s June, 2013 UX Boot Camp with American Public Media’s Marketplace Money radio show, where students explored the next horizon of audio programming—a paradigm shift from broadcast to conversation-based platforms.

The Challenge
Students rolled up their sleeves to help the show respond to the trend away from traditional radio by finding the right mix of alternative distribution platforms. Marketplace Money came equally ready to take a radical departure from their current format in order to create a new model that redefines the roles of host, show, and audience in the digital age. To reach this goal, students focused on designing solutions that addressed three big challenges:

  1. Engage a new, younger audience that is tech savvy, and provide easy access to content via new platforms, such as podcasts, satellite radio shows, and the Internet.
  2. Inspire audience participation and contribution. Facilitate conversations and inspire people to share their personal stories so that listeners can learn from each other.
  3. Design ways for the host to carry an influential brand or style that extends beyond the limits of the show and engage with the audience around personal finance, connecting with listeners in ways that are likeable, useful, and trustworthy, making the topic of personal finance cool, fun and approachable.

At the end of the four-day Boot Camp, student teams presented final pitches to Marketplace Money, and a panel of experienced Cooper designers offered feedback on their ideas and presentations.In the following excerpts from each day, you can test your own sensory preferences for receiving content as you see, hear and read how design ideas evolved at the Boot Camp, inspiring new relationships between people and radio.

Marketplace Money Class

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