4 Reasons Why You Should Make A Service Blueprint

This year Cooper U launched its first ever public training focused on customer experience design. Nancy Chu, one of our attendees, shared some of her takeaways from class with us. 

4 reasons why you should put together a Service Blueprint for your service:

  • You understand that providing a cohesive customer experience is a requirement in today’s service oriented society
  • You want to understand your customer experience in its entirety
  • You want to identify places where you can improve the entire customer service experience
  • You want to motivate people in different parts of your organization so that you can work together to improve your customer experience from all touchpoints

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One student's takeaways from Cooper's Transforming Customer Experience training. 

The Drawing Board: Pull-Cord

Here at Cooper, we find that looking at the world from the perspective of people and their goals causes us to notice a lot of bad interactions in our daily lives. We can’t help but pick up a whiteboard marker to scribble out a better idea. We put together “The Drawing Board”, a series of narrated videos, to showcase some of this thinking. These aren’t meant to be slick, highly-produced demos—just some ideas we’ve thrown up on the board to stimulate thought and discussion. So enjoy. Discuss. Design.

This Drawing Board is about riding the bus.

Until a bus rider is familiar with a particular route, there’s anxiety around either pulling the cord soon or too late. Let’s meet two riders who have that anxiety minimized as they head to the same appointment with a service called Pull Cord.

This is the tenth Drawing Board published on the Cooper Journal. See more on at http://www.cooper.com/category/drawing_board/.

A video of an interaction design scenario about minimizing anxiety riding an unfamiliar bus. 

The color of empathy is not flat: Insights to Color Blindness & Design.  

Line, motion, space, texture, size , form, shape, typography, and color.

As a member of the 9 structural units, or elements of visual interaction design, the role of color is integral to the way we communicate, parse, and enhance information on and off the screen. In an attempt to simplify human interaction with the digital interface, designers have pursued the style of a “flat UI”. This bare-bones approach relying mostly on rectangular shapes and solid, flat color is meant to place a user’s focus on content. The visual shift from skeuomorphism to flatland also helped to foreshadow a product’s ease-of-use by dramatically simplifying how the interface looked. 

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Designing for color blindness (aka Daltonism) is an example of how designers can practice visual empathy and learn to experience the world from someone else’s perspective.

Creating Personas

This May, Cooper U launched a brand new 1-day workshop all about personas. One of the participants, Eeva Ilama, shared her takeaways from the class on UX Booth. Here's some of what she wrote: 

After having attended some of Cooper’s highly reputable interaction and visual interface design courses a few years back, I was beyond thrilled when I saw that UX Booth was offering a free ticket to one of their San Francisco-based readers to one of Cooper’s brand new courses called Putting Personas to Work.

The course was targeted towards user experience practitioners and the challenges they face at their workplaces when trying to apply personas to their product design and development processes. Though personas are an awesome design tool, we all agreed that they often get a bad rap. For example:

  • There is confusion about the differences between different types of personas (marketing vs. design personas)
  • There are misconceptions about how personas originate (the most accurate and convincing personas are based on actual field research)
  • Poorly constructed personas undermine the credibility of all personas
  • Poor communication about personas within an organization
  • Lack of clarity around how personas should be used throughout design
  • Lack of understanding of how design personas can be used over time 

The course agenda was designed to address all these concerns and misconceptions in detail, to provide students with the ammo they need when trying to achieve stakeholder buy-in.

You can read Eeva's full account here on UX Booth

In May, Cooper U launched its first-ever, public 1-day workshop all about personas. One of the participants, Eeva Ilama, shared her takeaways on UX Booth. Here's what she wrote.  

SF Design Week 2015: A Closer Look at Cooper

Each summer during San Francisco’s Design Week we celebrate our craft with events and open studios. Drop by our studio to share drinks and eats, and explore our space.

What: Cooper’s Open House during AIGA's SF Design Week Studio Crawl

When: Tuesday, June 9th from 6pm-9pm

Where: Cooper’s Studio, 85 2nd St, 8th Floor, San Francisco, CA

RSVP here

On June 9th Cooper is opening it's doors for AIGA's annual Design Week Open Studio Tour. Join us!

Raising Leaders, the UX Boot Camp with Girls Leadership

Help parents raise resilient daughters that know who they are, what they believe, and how to express it.

Team up with Girls Leadership in the UX Boot Camp this August 11-14 to craft a strategy that nurtures relationships with parents as they influence the next generation of women leaders. 

Interested? Sign up now.

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Build your UX design skills while working on a real-world project for Girls Leadership in the UX Boot Camp this August 11-14, 2015.

Easy win: Mac OS

Being an interaction designer means you’re aware of improvements that can be made in the things you use every day. This one is about copying and pasting in Mac OS. Hey, Apple! Here’s an easy win.

So you've copied a couple of files in Mac OS and you need to paste them in a folder with a lot of other files. You navigate to that folder, which you like to keep in list view, and right click to get the contextual menu where you expect to see a paste option.

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Being an interaction designer means you’re aware of improvements that can be made in the things you use every day. This one is about copying and pasting in Mac OS. Hey, Apple! Here’s an easy win.

Customer Journey Map or Service Blueprint?

If you have a hammer, everything is a nail. If you have a service blueprint, everything is a detail to be nailed down, even if those details don’t contribute to your ultimate goal. To design and deploy services, it’s crucial to have both journey maps and service blueprints in your tool kit. This post will help you determine which tool is right for the job. 

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To design and deploy services, it’s crucial to have both journey maps and service blueprints in your tool kit. This post will help you determine which tool is right for the job. 

Because Personas

On Friday, May 1st, Cooper's Design Education Strategist Nikki Knox chatted with 150 curious designers about the importance of personas and how to put them to work. Here are some of the highlights: 

On getting buy-in for research...

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A recap of Design Education Strategist Nikki Knox's AMA on personas and UX design. 

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