Posts about Experience design


A Public Display of Interface

Graphic Design from the Collection, May 14–October 23, 2016, SFMOMA, Floor 6

The last time I visited SFMOMA was 3 years ago, just before they closed for a major expansion of the museum. I worked on an interface that had just won an interaction design award several months prior to my visit and was on a designer’s high, daydreaming as I walked through the museum, wondering, would a modern art museum, like SFMOMA ever feature the design of something like an interface? Maybe I could be part of that history, contributing to an innovative interface or at least one little icon. 


Amused by the idea that one day there could be an exhibition detailing the mode of interface style throughout the years, I imagined the possible exhibits celebrating a functional, digital aesthetic.

Consenting Affordances: Web vs. Desktop and their Lovechild, Mobile

Wistful Analog: Skeuomorphism and the Rise of Flatland

Extravagant Limitations: Evolution of the Application Icon

Window Shopping: The Armors of Netscape, Explorer, Firefox, and Chrome


Could something like a 16x16 icon be on display in a modern art museum? Would something so tiny and digital be considered too silly and insignificant to rest under the same roof as a Rauschenberg, O'Keefe, or Warhol? With the awakening of a new SFMOMA, the interface daydreaming stopped and revealed a new reality: the recognition of an artform whose infancy rivals that of Pop Art but until now has yet to be collected, to tell a new story, found on floor 6 in the exhibit: Typeface to Interface.

Typeface to Interface.

I was reunited with those interface exhibition dreams during the opening of the overwhelmingly airy and far-too-much-to-see-in-a-day new SFMOMA. The 170,000 square feet of exhibition space turns the museum into one of the largest art museums in the United States (larger than the New York MOMA and The Getty Center in Los Angeles) making SFMOMA one of the largest museums in the world specifically focusing on modern and contemporary art. 

The exhibit takes selected work from the museum's permanent graphic design collection (spanning as far back as 1950) and joins it with examples of graphic design that has shaped the development of the interface – our modern day means of visual communication. Posters, visual communication systems, and annual reports are interwoven with a variety of technology platforms: the desktop interface, the stylus, and the mobile touchscreen – the tools and methods we’ve used to communicate via the interface. Underlying all of this are the foundations of visual design and as a result an understanding of human behavior.

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With the awakening of a new SFMOMA, the interface daydreaming stopped and revealed a new reality: the recognition of an artform whose infancy rivals that of Pop Art but until now has yet to be collected, to tell a new story, found on floor 6 in the exhibit: Typeface to Interface. 

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From CX to CVX: Delivering and capturing value, by design

I often tell people that I’m passionate about designing value exchange, and I am often met with blank stares. Here’s why this little-known but powerful principle matters.  

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At every encounter between your brand, business, product, or service—across channels and over time—you have an opportunity to capture value from and/or deliver value to your customer. Value exchange is the idea that every encounter should involve both delivering and capturing value. Customer experience (CX) is actually the experience of value exchange. 

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Rethinking UX Research: Non-Verbal Clues

By: Katherine Hill & Robin Zander

Understanding the end user is a complex and sometimes daunting process. Typically, we as humans don’t know what we want until we see it. We need experts to interpret our segmented requests and half baked ideas in order to design something we think we might like to use.

As the researcher, designer, or expert in any creative field this can be maddening. The individual uneducated in the specific field attempts to describe details and nuances without the proper language, experience, or expertise.

However, when working with clients, interpreting their needs is the name of the game. So, we’d like to propose a new (and old) way to go about it- pay attention to the nonverbals.

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As the researcher, designer, or expert in any creative field this can be maddening. The individual uneducated in the specific field attempts to describe details and nuances without the proper language, experience, or expertise. However, when working with clients, interpreting their needs is the name of the game. So, we’d like to propose a new (and old) way to go about it- pay attention to the nonverbals.

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Sound Design: From the Ears of a Motion Designer

...How do you communicate with a user when their eyes aren’t glued to their screen? As a motion designer, I firmly believe that motion design is a critical consideration in the world of experience design. As I’m learning more about sound design, I’m realizing that it is equally critical to a user’s experience.

A few months ago, I was inspired by Adi Robertson’s article, “Sound Decision” in which she covers the audio branding created by Skype. Sound is something I pay particular attention to; maybe it’s my love of music that influences my interest or that I am intrigued by experiences that touch on multiple senses. I really believe that sound is an area that should be explored and considered when creating unique experiences for people who are constantly bugged to look at their screens.

I’m not talking about pops and pings that demand your attention to the screen, I want blips and bloops that reinforce interactions I have made without picking up my phone to see that I “got it right.”

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A few months ago, I was inspired by Adi Robertson’s article, “Sound Decision” in which she covers the audio branding created by Skype. Sound is something I pay particular attention to; maybe it’s my love of music that influences my interest or that I am intrigued by experiences that touch on multiple senses. I really believe that sound is an area that should be explored and considered when creating unique experiences for people who are constantly bugged to look at their screens.  

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Classification and Design

Us | Taxonomy | The World 

I’ve been interested in classification and taxonomy for a long time. Categories are everywhere, and we use them intentionally or unintentionally to understand a lot of stuff. They’re also great at slithering away when you try to pin them down. In this short series of posts, I want to explore how classification manifests in design, what its relationship is to other popular design concepts like mental models, and what kind of new lens it can provide for understanding how people understand.

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In this article, I explore how thinking about design work explicitly through a lens of classification. We think in categories and so do the tools that we use, and they make suggestions about how we should classify the world. By paying attention to this process of classification, we gain a new tool to see how people understand the world and how our products can, for better or worse, change how they see the world.

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6 before ‘16: Top Design Talks of this Year

Crowd-sourced from everyone  at Cooper, here are some of the most thought provoking and enjoyable design-related talks of 2015: 

Redefining Value: Bridging the Innovation Culture Divide by Nathan Shedroff: 

Rethinking the value that design brings to the table.


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Crowd-sourced from everyone at Cooper, here are some of the most thought provoking and enjoyable design-related talks of 2015: 

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Uncovering Service Design Opportunities: A Checklist

You understand your customer’s experience and your back of house service delivery processes. Maybe you’ve even created a service blueprint or a value chain map. You’re ready to take on the world! Or rather, the service system. Use this handy checklist to make sure you don’t miss any major opportunities. 

We’ve identified five primary categories of service design opportunity. The first three are the most obvious and the most essential, and the final two are what we recommend for organizations who are ready to tackle the future.  

The next time you're reviewing a customer journey map or service blueprint, use this list to help you think through all the types of potential improvements that might be possible.

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You understand your customer’s experience and your back of house service delivery processes. Maybe you’ve even created a service blueprint or a value chain map. You’re ready to take on the world! Or rather, the service system. Use this handy checklist to make sure you don’t miss any major opportunities. 

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Customer Journey Map or Service Blueprint?

If you have a hammer, everything is a nail. If you have a service blueprint, everything is a detail to be nailed down, even if those details don’t contribute to your ultimate goal. To design and deploy services, it’s crucial to have both journey maps and service blueprints in your tool kit. This post will help you determine which tool is right for the job. 

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To design and deploy services, it’s crucial to have both journey maps and service blueprints in your tool kit. This post will help you determine which tool is right for the job. 

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Why Invisible Boyfriend Doesn’t Cut it for a Narcissistic Pessimist

A few months ago a bunch of us at Cooper discovered a new service for lonely single people. Surprisingly it wasn’t just another dating app where you swipe left or right within point-five seconds and hope that doesn’t make you a shallow human being. It’s called Invisible Boyfriend and it 100% guarantees you will find a boyfriend within minutes. The one slight problem is that the person you’re dating is a mother faking faker. That’s right, it’s all pretend. Yup, it’s come to the point where people are actually dating services. Obviously you can see why I was intrigued. 

I wasn’t exactly the service’s target… okay, I wasn’t even close to the target audience. Let me just tell you flat out, I hate relationships. No, it’s not because I’m not in a relationship, but secretly longing for one, and no, it’s not because I’ve developed a borderline unhealthy relationship with my cats. I’m just truly happy being single! I’m young, and I’m spending these years having fun instead of getting all kinds of tied down. However, I wanted to try it anyway. I thought, ‘dating a boyfriend that I create would almost be like dating myself: PERFECT!!’. 

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A few months ago a bunch of us at Cooper discovered a new service for lonely single people. The one slight problem is that the person you’re dating is a mother faking faker. That’s right, it’s all pretend. Yup, it’s come to the point where people are actually dating services. Obviously you can see why I was intrigued. 

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6 Lessons for Service Blueprinting

Learning about customer experience, and how to leverage the service blueprint as a research tool, is essential for researchers and designers, as this will help them stay ahead in this rapidly changing world. 

This March, I was lucky enough to facilitate a Thinkshop with 25 designers attending the AIGA Y Design Conference. We left with some interesting conclusions around how to build and use service blueprints as research tools. 

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