Posts about Experience design


What does Pair Design look like?

I’ve broken down our typical goal-directed design process into broad phases that should be relatively easy to map to your own. But, if this is your first time reading about Pair Design from Cooper, I recommend reading up on the distinctions between the generator and synthesizer roles I’ve written about before, as I’ll be referencing those terms.

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If you’re trying to figure out whether Pair Design is right for you or your organization, it’s useful to have a model of what it looks like across an interaction design project. So, let me paint you a picture.

Visual Design for White Labelled Products

Designing a product with the intention of being “white labelled” means that you are creating a software for a client to incorporate into their existing (visual language) system. Every now and then design consultants are hired by another consultant to work on a third party’s existing system. This what you call a super white label. Here, you not only have to consider your client’s needs, but your client’s client’s needs, too. It can be easy to start designing with everyone’s goals in mind and eventually lose focus, leaving no one satisfied in the end. These are some basic tips I’ve found that to help start and manage a white labelled project. 


It can be easy to start designing with everyone’s goals in mind and eventually lose focus, leaving no one satisfied in the end.

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Let's Jam. 

What's a Service Jam?

The Global Service Jam is a 48-hour event that brings people from all backgrounds together to learn new approaches, tools, and methods for designing services. 

This isn’t a watch-and-learn kind of conference, the GSJ participants get their hands dirty, creating services, not slide decks. 

On the evening of the first night, a theme is announced, then for the next 48 hours jammers focus on exploring, iterating, and prototyping new service design ideas. All the Jams share the same starting themes, and publish their local results over a central platform.

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Come join us for the San Francisco edition of the Global Service Jam.

Easy win: Twitter

Being an interaction designer means you’re aware of improvements that can be made in the things you use every day. This one is about the notifications in Twitter’s iPhone app. Hey, Twitter! Here’s an easy win.

So you’re on your iPhone when it buzzes in your hand. Hey, neat! A Twitter somethingorother. You open the app, only to see that there are no notifications for your current Twitter profile.

That’s cool. It must be for one of the other Twitter profiles you use. So you open the list of profiles only to see…nothing. No hint of where this little tweet of goodness awaits you.

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Being an interaction designer means you’re aware of improvements that can be made in the things you use every day. This one is about the notifications in Twitter’s iPhone app. Hey, Twitter! Here’s an easy win.So you’re on your iPhone when it buzzes in your hand. Hey, neat! A Twitter somethingorother. You open the app, only to see that there [...]

Service Blueprints: Laying the Foundation

Cooper workshop service blueprintingThis article was co-written by Izac Ross, Lauren Chapman Ruiz, and Shahrzad Samadzadeh

Recently, we introduced you to the core concepts of service design, a powerful approach that examines complex interactions between people and their service experiences. With this post, we examine one of the primary tools of service design: the service blueprint.

Today’s products and services are delivered through systems of touchpoints that cross channels and blend both digital and human interactions. The service blueprint is a diagram that allows designers to look beyond the product and pixels to examine the systems that bring a customer’s experience to life.

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This article was co-written by Izac Ross, Lauren Chapman Ruiz, and Shahrzad SamadzadehRecently, we introduced you to the core concepts of service design, a powerful approach that examines complex interactions between people and their service experiences. With this post, we examine one of the primary tools of service design: the service blueprint.Today’s products and services are delivered through systems of [...]

Service Design 101

This article was co-written by Lauren Chapman Ruiz and Izac Ross

We all hear the words "service design" bandied about, but what exactly does it mean? Clients and designers often struggle to find a common language to define the art of coordinating services, and frequent questions arise. Often it emerges as necessary in the space of customer experience or complicated journey maps. In response, here is a brief FAQ primer to show the lay of the land in service design.

What are services?

Services are intangible economic goods—they lead to outcomes as opposed to physical things customers own. Outcomes are generated by value exchanges that occur through mediums called touchpoints. For example, when you use Zipcar, you don’t actually own the Zipcar, you buy temporary ownership. You use the car, then transfer it to someone else once it is returned. Every point in which you engage with Zipcar is a touchpoint.

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This article was co-written by Lauren Chapman Ruiz and Izac RossWe all hear the words "service design" bandied about, but what exactly does it mean? Clients and designers often struggle to find a common language to define the art of coordinating services, and frequent questions arise. Often it emerges as necessary in the space of customer experience or complicated journey [...]

8 teams. 3 designers. 1 mission.

In established professional sports, technology often seems like an afterthought, applied like a band-aid, forgotten entirely, or employed in unimaginative ways. Early this April, a start-up league called the National Pro Grid League approached Cooper with a new challenge - to help them introduce a new sport that has integrated technology from the start. Cooper has been working closely with the NPGL to design the fan experience, through interactive tools, infographics and Jumbotron graphics.

Working with the NPGL gave us the opportunity to flex our design muscles on a project that involved crafting the physical and digital fan experience. We’ve just had our first major user testing opportunity and we’ve walked away with a few lessons. Here’s what we’ve learned so far.

Working on this project has helped me remember that Interaction Designers need lots of tools within reach.

- Brendan Kneram, Interaction Designer

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In established professional sports, technology often seems like an afterthought, applied like a band-aid, forgotten entirely, or employed in unimaginative ways. Early this April, a start-up league called the National Pro Grid League approached Cooper with a new challenge - to help them introduce a new sport that has integrated technology from the start. Cooper has been working closely with [...]

No Cheap Seats: Designing the Fan Experience

Remember when you first began to learn the rules of a game? That’s when you began to join a new family, one that can span generations, languages, and distances. In some cases, this family defines part of who you are. You’re able to form instant bonds when you see someone with the same jersey and immediately question the judgement of someone who rooted for the rival. When that happens, you’ve committed. You’re a fan.

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Remember when you first began to learn the rules of a game? That’s when you began to join a new family, one that can span generations, languages, and distances. In some cases, this family defines part of who you are. You’re able to form instant bonds when you see someone with the same jersey and immediately question the judgement of [...]

Interaction14 - Thoughts on Collaboration and Communication

The final day of Interaction14 was full of talks about collaboration and communication. Let’s kick off with a talk from our own Chris Noessel on a practice that is central to how Cooperistas design.

(side note: you can find sketchnotes from Thursday‘s and Friday‘s talks here)

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The final day of Interaction14 was full of talks about collaboration and communication. Let’s kick off with a talk from our own Chris Noessel on a practice that is central to how Cooperistas design.(side note: you can find sketchnotes from Thursday‘s and Friday‘s talks here)Pair Design and Why You Need ItChris Noessel (@ChrisNoessel)Sketchnote by @KShimmellPair Design and Why You Need [...]

Interaction14 - Is it Science, Art or something else?

While Friday’s talks seem to be quite level-headed compared Thursday’s design extravaganza, they weren’t any less provocative. Take a look at some of Friday‘s highlights (or sneak ahead to Saturday)

The De-Intellectualization of Design

Dan Rosenberg

Sketchnote by @ChrisNoessel

The De-Intellectualization of Design Big Idea:

Daniel Rosenberg, one of the old guard of Human-Computer Interaction, bemoaned the loss of a computer-science heavy approach to interaction design. He then shared his three-part antidote: Industry certification, employing Chief Design Officers, and better design education (read: computer and cognitive-science based). Guess which one of these was the audience’s “favorite”?

Hint:

Full description of The De-Intellectualization of Design here.

An excellent counterpoint to Dan’s observation was Irene Au’s early-morning mindfulness talk.

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While Friday’s talks seem to be quite level-headed compared Thursday’s design extravaganza, they weren’t any less provocative. Take a look at some of Friday‘s highlights (or sneak ahead to Saturday)The De-Intellectualization of DesignDan RosenbergSketchnote by @ChrisNoesselThe De-Intellectualization of Design Big Idea:Daniel Rosenberg, one of the old guard of Human-Computer Interaction, bemoaned the loss of a computer-science heavy approach to interaction [...]

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