About Face 4 diagrams, for you!

As part of its support for instructors using About Face in classrooms, Cooper is pleased to provide a PowerPoint deck of diagrams from the work in a Creative Commons 4.0 BY-ND license. What does that license mean to you? You are free to use all or part of this deck and share for any purpose as long as you do not modify the content, and include the attributions at the bottom of the slides. Drop it into decks, share amongst colleagues, and of course, if you have any questions, please drop us a line via education@cooper.com.

Note that we didn’t try to situate the slides in a larger context of meaning (that’s up to you) but the page numbers have been noted on each slide so you can reference that section of the text.

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No Cheap Seats: Designing the Fan Experience

Remember when you first began to learn the rules of a game? That’s when you began to join a new family, one that can span generations, languages, and distances. In some cases, this family defines part of who you are. You’re able to form instant bonds when you see someone with the same jersey and immediately question the judgement of someone who rooted for the rival. When that happens, you’ve committed. You’re a fan.

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Design > Critique > Repeat

There’s a lot of writing out there on how to run a productive critique.

One of my favorites is by Jake Knapp of Google Ventures where he lays out nine rules to follow. For example, one great rule is to write it before you say it – this requires 5-10 minutes of silent time to look at the work and write down your initial reactions. It allows you to respond to the work individually – eliminating groupthink. Scott Berkun also wrote a great guide on setting up a critique and goes into the details of specific questions to ask and what materials you’ll need.

So you’ve followed the best practices and just had a super productive critique.

Now what?

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Barry the Blog Post…

…or, Why Silly Names Make Silly Personas, and 8 Tips to Getting Your Personas Named More Effectively

You’ve seen them before and unfortunately, you’ll see them again. Personas with names like Sarah the Security-Minded, Adam the Artist, Gloomy Gus, or Uzziah the Uppity Unix User. (Wait. You don’t have a persona named Uzziah?)

“What’s in a name? That which we call a rose / By any other name would smell as sweet.”
—Romeo & Juliet, Act II scene 2

A quick word about doing this sort of thing. Don’t. On one level, sure, it works. The alliteration helps you remember both the name and the salient characteristic that that persona is meant to embody. Who was Gus? Oh that’s right. The gloomy one.

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Leading By Design

In my career, I’ve spent a lot of time learning from great design leaders. The best stand out as creative, thoughtful listeners, able to persuade with grace and speak hard truths, while uniting the team around a focused vision.

Through my involvement in Cooper U’s Design Leadership course, I’ve learned techniques to repeat the success of these leaders. Recently, I had the privilege of co-teaching with two of Cooper’s design leaders, Jenea Hayes and course creator Kendra Shimmell. In the class, these bright ladies presented tools that help the rest of us become leaders who can sell a vision, unite a team, and achieve organizational consent. The following overview captures a small slice of the course content from general principles to practical applications that are simple yet powerfully effective ideas for all of us.

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Interaction14 – Is it Science, Art or something else?

While Friday’s talks seem to be quite level-headed compared Thursday’s design extravaganza, they weren’t any less provocative. Take a look at some of Friday‘s highlights (or sneak ahead to Saturday)

The De-Intellectualization of Design

Dan Rosenberg

Sketchnote by @ChrisNoessel

The De-Intellectualization of Design Big Idea:

Daniel Rosenberg, one of the old guard of Human-Computer Interaction, bemoaned the loss of a computer-science heavy approach to interaction design. He then shared his three-part antidote: Industry certification, employing Chief Design Officers, and better design education (read: computer and cognitive-science based). Guess which one of these was the audience’s “favorite”?

Hint:

Full description of The De-Intellectualization of Design here.

An excellent counterpoint to Dan’s observation was Irene Au’s early-morning mindfulness talk.

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Interaction14 – Food, Comics, and the UI of Nature

Interaction14 is off to a blazing start, and man if it doesn’t sound like a kaleidoscope of designers, thought-leaders, and crazy beautiful ideas. There’s everything from interactive skateboard ramps to talks about principles of user experience design learned from cats.

Exactly what kind of “conference” is this?

This year Cooper sent over a troop of people for inspiration, elucidation and to capture some of the creative spark that only happens when you put hundreds of brilliant people in a big room for 4 days. In between workshops, talks, and happy hours, they’ve been slapping together some pretty stunning sketchnotes for us local folks. Here are notes from 4 of the talks that went down on Thursday. See sketchnotes from Friday and Saturday too!

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New Peers, Practices, and Perspectives

Takeaways from Cooper U in Philadelphia

A guest post by Cooper U alumni, Hanna Kang-Brown

As a career changer and the first UX Designer to be hired at my company, there’s a lot of self-learning I do on the job. Reading books and blogs have been essential to developing my UX process, but when I had the opportunity to attend Cooper U’s Interaction Design Training in Philadelphia this past December, I jumped at the chance. I wanted a week of hands-on training, and the opportunity to learn a thorough interaction design process with a group of other professionals. Some highlights from the week and my biggest takeaways are below.

My Biggest Takeaways

Clarifying Process
I was already familiar with the interaction design process, but the course helped deepen my understanding of it through hands on activities. I discovered ways in which I had cut corners in my design process and how I could have a better end product if I spent more time initially considering business stakeholder goals, personas and sketching out scenarios.

Speaking of Sketching
I’ve always been a reluctant sketcher because I never thought I was very good at it. We did a lot of sketching, from user profiles to storyboards and wireframes, and it helped me gain more confidence and a better appreciation for its usefulness as a lightweight prototyping method.

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