Posts about Business


How much interface does your analytics product need?

Original article posted on Medium.

While working on a project earlier this year, an interesting tidbit emerged from research: users tended to have just a few simple needs when it came to accessing data. Given that the tool we were working on is pretty robust, the lightweight nature of the most common use cases was a surprise… there is more “tool” available than what is necessarily needed. 

This reflects a broader trend among analytics providers: there’s a popular interface-first reflex when it comes to building data products. We opt for flexibility over convenience, often attempting to satisfy all plausible use cases rather than optimizing for the most frequent ones. Here’s an outline of some analytics use-cases, addressed in a one-size-fits-all way:

The approach is, in a way, straightforward. Give the user access to the data. If they have a question, they can go to the interface and “tell” it what they need. They then digest the information, isolating some meaningful insight (hopefully) before disseminating the information to their peers, supervisors, or other stakeholders. 

The interface-first approach is capable of satisfying many use cases for end users. Analytics tools can be used for all sorts of purposes — from status updates to fact-finding to open-ended exploration — but it’s not unusual to see a user base rally around a few lightweight ones (hint: open-ended exploration is usually not among them). Let’s think through a simple use case: a gym owner wants to know if member attendance has changed this week, as weather has been especially nice. Here’s how that scenario looks for an interface-first analytics tool:

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Taking a look at different approaches to analytics products: interface as a "tool" vs technology as an "assistant." Inspired by research done in the field. 

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If your RFP was a Tinder profile, you’d never get a date

During my two decades as a design and strategy consultant, I’ve seen countless requests for proposals (RFPs) in my inbox. We consultants are honored and LOVE when potential clients reach out about exciting new projects. (Thank you!) That said, sometimes my delight at reviewing an RFP is tempered by anxiety; will this be another one of those RFPs?

We certainly don’t expect clients to walk up to Coopers’ doors with a bag of money and a blank piece of paper for us to dictate how we will work together. That said, RFPs can be an obstacle between a firm and the client, making it hard for both parties to evaluate whether we’re a match.

From a consultant’s perspective, here are ten recommendations for making an RFP a highly effective tool for finding the perfect design and strategy partner:

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From a consultant’s perspective, here are ten recommendations for making an RFP a highly effective tool for finding the perfect design and strategy partner.

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The Roles Trilogy

Modern product teams consist of three key groups working together—Design, Development, and Product Management. It’s surprising how many companies struggle, simply because they don’t recognize the need for all three to work on equal footing but with clear lines of responsibility. Putting expectations in place makes all three groups more effective, allows each to do the job they’re best at, and ultimately results in a thoughtful, well-constructed, kick-ass product. 

So let me tell you about your job.

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Modern product teams consist of three groups working together: Design, Development, and Product Management. Let me tell you how to do your job.

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1DocWay: Increasing access to psychiatric care

We’ve been chatting with some of the startup founders we’ve met through Rock Health. They’ve offered us an inside look into how they’re tackling some of the biggest challenges in healthcare. Now we’re offering you a peek behind the curtain. 

Company: 1DocWay

Founders: Danish Munir, Samir Malik, and Mubeen Malik

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We’ve been chatting with some of the startup founders we’ve met through Rock Health. They’ve offered us an inside look into how they’re tackling some of the biggest challenges in healthcare. 

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Transforming Customer Experience with Journey Mapping

A customer journey map is a versatile tool that can serve many purposes: mapping how a current customer experience unfolds over time, planning the orchestration of a future experience across touchpoints, or uncovering business opportunities in the form of unmet customer needs. We’ve developed a new journey mapping canvas that can handle all three of the goals above, and we’d love to invite you (yes you!) to try it out. 

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A customer journey map is a versatile tool that can serve many purposes: mapping how a current customer experience unfolds over time, planning the orchestration of a future experience across touchpoints, or uncovering business opportunities in the form of unmet customer needs. We’ve developed a new journey mapping canvas that can handle all three of the goals above, and we’d love to invite you (yes you!) to try it out.

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6 Lessons for Service Blueprinting

Learning about customer experience, and how to leverage the service blueprint as a research tool, is essential for researchers and designers, as this will help them stay ahead in this rapidly changing world. 

This March, I was lucky enough to facilitate a Thinkshop with 25 designers attending the AIGA Y Design Conference. We left with some interesting conclusions around how to build and use service blueprints as research tools. 

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Leading By Design

Design Leadership

In my career, I’ve spent a lot of time learning from great design leaders. The best stand out as creative, thoughtful listeners, able to persuade with grace and speak hard truths, while uniting the team around a focused vision.

Through my involvement in Cooper U’s Design Leadership course, I’ve learned techniques to repeat the success of these leaders. Recently, I had the privilege of co-teaching with two of Cooper’s design leaders, Jenea Hayes and course creator Kendra Shimmell. In the class, these bright ladies presented tools that help the rest of us become leaders who can sell a vision, unite a team, and achieve organizational consent. The following overview captures a small slice of the course content from general principles to practical applications that are simple yet powerfully effective ideas for all of us.

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In my career, I’ve spent a lot of time learning from great design leaders. The best stand out as creative, thoughtful listeners, able to persuade with grace and speak hard truths, while uniting the team around a focused vision. Through my involvement in Cooper U’s Design Leadership course, I’ve learned techniques to repeat the success of these leaders. Recently, I [...]

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From Superman to the Avengers: Rethinking Bruce Mau Design

[Excerpt from a UX Magazine  article written by Teresa Brazen. Full article here.]

Everyone loves a hero. But what happens to

organizations when their heroic leaders retire?

Four years ago,  Bruce Mau Design  (BMD) faced this dilemma. The company's infamous founder,  Bruce Mau, left so that he could create a platform to address bigger global issues that were meaningful to him called the  Massive Change Network. Those who remained at BMD and its new President and CEO,  Hunter Tura, were presented with an interesting opportunity: reinvention. Curious about the  culture of BMD  today, I interviewed Tura in his Toronto office. Here are some takeaways for teams and organizations from their evolution.

Rethink Your Mental Model

Bruce Mau Design was founded upon what Tura describes as the "Superman model,” which meant the founder was seen as the "creative auteur" of the company. Mau's exit gave the BMD team an opportunity to rethink how they positioned themselves, what services they wanted to offer, and how they wanted to work together. Read the rest of the  article  here.

[Excerpt from a UX Magazine article written by Teresa Brazen. Full article here.]Everyone loves a hero. But what happens toorganizations when their heroic leaders retire? Four years ago, Bruce Mau Design (BMD) faced this dilemma. The company's infamous founder, Bruce Mau, left so that he could create a platform to address bigger global issues that were meaningful to him called [...]

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What’s culture got to do with it?

In short, everything.

Does your work culture make it challenging for your team or organization to do great work? Well this could be the year you make it better. At Fluxible 2013, our very own Teresa Brazen, Design Education Strategist, delivered a 30 minute talk, Make Culture, Not War: The Secret of Great Teams and Organizations, about the role and impact of culture on organizations. Of particular interest to the UX crowd, she explained how designers are uniquely positioned to influence culture by employing familiar tools from our bag of tricks. Enjoy (and share!) the video below!

If you're interested in getting your hands dirty, you (and perhaps a few folks from your team/organization) might want to check out our newly launched 1-day Designing Culture Master Class. This training aims to help people intentionally approach their team or organizational culture - through a cultural assessment, visioning and goal-setting exercises, and development of a tactical plan to improve their culture (some of the topics Teresa hits on in her talk below). Teresa and Susan Dybbs, Managing Director of Interaction Design at Cooper, will be teaching the course in our San Francisco offices on Friday, January 31st.

We are also offering Designing Culture in-house training for organizations that would benefit from having a larger group (management, teams, etc) go through this process together. Contact us at cooperu@cooper.com for details.

Video: Make Culture, Not War: The Secret to Great Teams & Organizations

In short, everything.Does your work culture make it challenging for your team or organization to do great work? Well this could be the year you make it better. At Fluxible 2013, our very own Teresa Brazen, Design Education Strategist, delivered a 30 minute talk, Make Culture, Not War: The Secret of Great Teams and Organizations, about the role and impact [...]

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Television is dead. Or is it?

How the Internet, devices, and a new generation of viewers are redefining the “boob tube” of the future

Announcing the next Cooper Parlor: The Future of TV

When: Thursday, October 24th (Networking at 6, event starts at 6:30)
Moderated by: Richard Bullwinkle, Head of US Television Innovation at Samsung and Jeremy Toeman, CEO of the startup Dijit Media
Where: Cooper's Studio, 85 2nd Street, 8th Floor, San Francisco
Cost: $10
Tickets

Once, television was simple. Families gathered religiously around a glowing box to watch the latest episode of “I love Lucy”. Fast-forward to today: the Internet enables a multitude of new viewing devices, and wildly different viewing habits have turned “television” on its head. In this Cooper Parlor, Richard Bullwinkle, Head of US Television Innovation at Samsung and Jeremy Toeman, CEO of the startup Dijit Media will share some curious trends in media consumption, technological advances, and the evolution of show content and format. Then, they’ll lead a brainstorming session to rethink the “television of the future” together.

Here are just a few curious factoids we’ll explore:

  •  What is the #1 device for watching Netflix? The iPad? A laptop? It turns out it’s the Sony Playstation 3. Why do viewers flock to this device rather than the connected TV or an iPad?
  • Over 90% of all TV viewers use a second screen while watching TV.  How might this impact the way we design the television experience and programming?
  • Can you guess why 70% of connected TVs in the US actually get connected to the internet, but only 30% do in Europe?

Join us as we discuss where TV is headed, and generate new ideas for what television can be!

What is the Cooper Parlor?

The Cooper Parlor is a gathering of designers and design-minded people to exchange ideas around a specific topic. We aim to cultivate conversation that instigates, surprises, entertains, and most importantly, broadens our community’s collective knowledge and perspective about the potential for design

How the Internet, devices, and a new generation of viewers are redefining the “boob tube” of the futureAnnouncing the next Cooper Parlor: The Future of TVWhen: Thursday, October 24th (Networking at 6, event starts at 6:30) Moderated by: Richard Bullwinkle, Head of US Television Innovation at Samsung and Jeremy Toeman, CEO of the startup Dijit Media Where: Cooper's Studio, 85 [...]

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